President Trump’s Campaign Website Hacked

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Reports are emerging that President Trump’s campaign website was successfully hacked after a number of screenshots were posted of a domain seized by hackers critical of the president’s policies. 

Trump’s campaign website, listed under the domain of DonaldJTrump.com was successfully hacked by a group of unknown hackers who posted a notice onto the site saying that “this site was seized.” 

The FBI is yet to comment on the hack, however, Trump’s Communications Director Tim Murtaugh has confirmed the data breach while stating that no sensitive information or data had been accessed by the threat actors believed to be involved in a cryptocurrency scam. 

Hackers wrote that “the world has had enough of the fake news spreaded daily by president donald j trump,” adding that “it is time for the world to know the truth.” 

“Multiple devices were compromised that gave full access to trump and relatives,” they wrote. “Most internal and secret conversations strictly classified information is exposed proving that the trump-gov is involved in the origin of the corona virus.” 

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A screenshot from DonaldJTrump.com

The hackers continued to claim that they have incriminating evidence that “completely discredits Mr Trump as president, proving his criminal involvement and cooperation with foreign actors manipulating the 2020 elections…. The US citizens have no choice,” they write. 

“Today is the day – the whole world can decide if they want to know that truth or not,” they wrote.  In a bizarre move, the hackers listed two separate cryptocurrency wallets, which prompted visitors to vote for their preferred option via a payment to the specified ‘yes’ or ‘no’ wallet.  

They say that “after the deadline we will compare the funds and execute the will of the world. In both cases we will inform you, you can identify our key,” they wrote. 

Authors of a TechCrunch report have said that the campaign website was most likely hacked by cryptocurrency scammers that get “people to irreversibly send cryptocurrency to a mysterious address,” which is “a common form of scam online, usually relying on brief appearances on high visibility platforms like celebrity Twitter accounts and the like. This one is no different, and was taken down within minutes,” writes Devin Coldewey. 

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The message planted by hackers on Trump’s campaign website was taken down after twenty minutes, and is now operating as per normal. Tim Murtaugh, who works as the Trump campaign’s Communications Director said since that “earlier this evening, the Trump campaign website was defaced and we are working with law enforcement authorities to investigate the source of the attack.”

“There was no exposure to sensitive data because none of it is actually stored on the site. The website has been restored,” Murtaugh said. 

Devin Coldewey, author of the TechCrunch report and industry expert has said  that “there is no indication that this track was in any way state-sponsored, and while it strikes a partisan tone, one can hardly say that this is a very coherent attack against the Trump platform.” 

“Though the diction seems not to be that of a native English speaker, there is no other positive evidence that the hack is of foreign origin,” he said, continuing to explain that campaign websites like the one that was hacked are prime targets for a hacker’s campaign considering the fact that they are not protected to the same extent as a government (.gov) platform, while being closely linked to a sitting president or opposition party figure. 

According to a report from News.com.au, president Trump recently told a group of reporters that “nobody gets hacked. To get hacked you need somebody with 197 IQ and he needs about 15 per cent of your password.” 

Journalists were quick to point out that the Trump hotel empire has suffered two considerable data breaches in recent years after being hacked, as well as the President’s own twitter page. Last week we reported that a Dutch security analyst was able to guess Trump’s ‘MAGA2020’ Twitter password and gain access to his account.

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